Ready for what? And why use our kids?

Has anyone noticed the disaster preparation commercials? I’m sure we have all seen them, but has anyone really taken the time to think about them? Why are they running more and more of them? And why are so many of the commercials geared towards our kids? While I do think its a great idea to have a plan and even supplies for a few days, it bugs me the way these are being marketed to us. Something about the commercials seem insidious.

A more in-depth look at ready.gov does reveal that they have been stepping up the “awareness campaign”. It includes sections on preparation, making kits, getting involved with businesses and communities, as well as it’s very own kids section, replete with games and other literature. I have to admit some of the information is good, but some of it is also laughable.

The theme seems to be have enough supplies for at least three days. I personally think that is a very anemic amount of supplies to stockpile. Here in Texas we have seen more than three days without power due to storms, extreme heat, or winter weather. I think a minimum of a week is better, preferably a month if its possible on your budget. Another interesting item they suggest keeping in your kit is a “ dust mask to filter contaminated air”. I personally cannot think of a dust mask that’s capable of filtering out anything more than dust. Hospital grade surgical masks are not basic dust masks, and even those are not close to full-faced mil-spec bio-chem masks or the full body biohazard suits.

In summary, it is a very good idea to have supplies and a plan in case of a disaster. But like most government sponsored programs, it is poorly designed, thought out, and executed. And the way so many commercials are targeting our youth in order to get adults involved in it as well seems to set a sinister undertone of using our kids to manipulate us.

I welcome any feedback on the subject matter, and in my next blog, I will discuss something I found on the ready.gov website that seemed quite Orwellian.

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